Search Term Record

  • Email This Page
  • Send Feedback
Name Columbia River
Details This 1,210-mile long river, the third longest in the U.S., rises in Columbia Lake in southeast British Columbia seventy-five miles northwest of the U.S. boundary and flows northwest and south through British Columbia and enters Washington in its northeast corner. After winding through the east area of the state, it forms the Washington-Oregon boundary and flows to the Pacific Ocean. Its drainage basin includes parts of seven states, and part of British Columbia. On May 19, 1792, it was named by Robert Gray, for his ship Columbia. A long list of other names which have been used over the years includes those chosen by Spanish explorers for all or part of the river: Ensenada de la Nuestra Senora de Asuncion, Estrada de Hezeta, and other names of great length terminating in Estrecha, Aguilar, San Roc, and Thegayo. It has been called The Oregon and River of the West. Indian names for portions of its course were Sken-I-Te-Ke, Chock-A-Li-Lum, and Swan-Ate-Ku.

Associated Records

Image of 384P - 1956.001.

384P - 1956.001.

Light colored leaf shaped stone point with convex base. A/L Cascade Point.

Image of 385P - 1956.001.

385P - 1956.001.

Medium colored leaf shaped stone point with convex base. A/L Cascade Point.

Image of 386P - 1956.001.

386P - 1956.001.

Dark colored stone end scraper. A/L Scrapers - Age undetermined. These tools were used in preparing hides, etc.

Image of 387P - 1956.001.

387P - 1956.001.

Dark colored stone side and end scraper. A/L End Scraper - Age undetermined. A/L Scrapers - Age undetermined. These tools were used in preparing hides, etc.

Image of 2001.004.0024 - Transparency, Slide

2001.004.0024 - Transparency, Slide

From the slide series "Development of the Columbia Basin," Set #13. Twenty-fourth slide of series (color), "The north dam of the equalization reservoir which prevents the water from flowing back into the Columbia River." Picture of water with hills in background. "North Dam" written in ink on bottom half of slide frame. "KODACHROME / TRANSPARENCY / PROCESSED BY KODAK" on one side of slide. Description of slide from "Development of the Columbia Basin" slide script.

Image of 2001.004.0033 - Transparency, Slide

2001.004.0033 - Transparency, Slide

From the slide series "Development of the Columbia Basin," Set #13. Thirtieth-third slide of series (color), "A short distance south of the Dry Falls, the highway drops down into the lower part of the Grand Coulee, once the river bed of the Columbia River when it was ice blocked out of its present course. Several beautiful alkali lakes occur between the Dry Falls and Soap Lake, where the Coulee ends." Picture of sagebrush with water and hills in background. "Lower part of / Grand Coulee" written in ink on bottom half of slide frame. "KODACHROME / TRANSPARENCY / PROCESSED BY KODAK" on one side of slide. Description of slide from "Development of the Columbia Basin" slide script.

Image of 2001.004.0062 - Transparency, Slide

2001.004.0062 - Transparency, Slide

From the slide series "Development of the Columbia Basin," Set #13. Sixty-second slide of series (color), "And let us return to where we began with the dry arid desert, deserted homes, and forsaken schools. This settler had a hard time to even get the logs to build the one-room log cabin. He had to float the logs up from the Columbia River many miles away, drag them over to where he wanted to build the house. He dug a well but it went dry in the summer when he needed water most. He had little of the comforts of today - all he did was to toil and hope for rain. How the Columbia Basin is changing!" Picture of log cabin in field with basalt columns in background. "Abandoned Home" written