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Name Mount St. Helens
Details Mount St. Helens is an active stratovolcano in Skamania County, Washington, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is located 96 miles (154 km) south of Seattle and 53 miles (85 km) northeast of Portland, Oregon. The mountain is part of the Cascade Range and was initially known as Louwala-Clough which means "smoking or fire mountain" in the language of the Klickitats. It was named for British diplomat Lord St Helens who was a friend of George Vancouver, an explorer who made a survey of the area in the late 18th century.

Associated Records

Image of 2006.001.0040 - Newspaper

2006.001.0040 - Newspaper

Newspaper: "A Reproduction of a Special Section, The Spokesman-Review" with headline "Volcano Erupts!" Sunday Collectors' Issue from May 25, 1980.

Image of 2005.012.0033 - 2005.012.

2005.012.0033 - 2005.012.

A small clear glass baby food jar with blue metal lid filled with Mount St. Helens volcanic ash. "Mt. Saint Helens Eruption / May 18, 1980 / Collected at Yakima, Wa." on typed label affixed to jar. From http://volcanoes.usgs.gov: "Small jagged pieces of rocks, minerals, and volcanic glass the size of sand and silt (less than 2 millimeters (1/12 inch) in diameter) erupted by a volcano are called volcanic ash. Very small ash particles can be less than 0.001 millimeters (1/25,000th of an inch) across. Volcanic ash is not the product of combustion, like the soft fluffy material created by burning wood, leaves, or paper. Volcanic ash is hard, does not dissolve in water, is extremely a

Image of 2005.012.0034 - 2005.012.

2005.012.0034 - 2005.012.

A small clear glass baby food jar with blue metal lid filled with Mount St. Helens volcanic ash. "Mt. Saint Helens Eruption / May 18, 1980 / Collected at Moses Lake, Wa." on typed label affixed to jar. From http://volcanoes.usgs.gov: "Small jagged pieces of rocks, minerals, and volcanic glass the size of sand and silt (less than 2 millimeters (1/12 inch) in diameter) erupted by a volcano are called volcanic ash. Very small ash particles can be less than 0.001 millimeters (1/25,000th of an inch) across. Volcanic ash is not the product of combustion, like the soft fluffy material created by burning wood, leaves, or paper. Volcanic ash is hard, does not dissolve in water, is extr